DIY Perfume with essential oils

Parfumgläser

A perfume is defined by its special composition of the individual fragrances. The right mixture of the individual fragrance components is of high relevance. You can put together the individual fragrances yourself and create your fragrance. Fragrances are divided into four fragrance families, and traditional French perfumery even distinguishes seven families:

  • Flowery: rose, jasmine, tuberose, lily of the valley, ylang ylang, neroli, palmarosa
  • Citrus: lemon, orange, bergamot, grapefruit, lime, tangerine, cedrat
  • Woody: sandalwood, cedar, patchouli, vetiver, iris
  • Oriental: ambergris, musk, vanilla
  • Fougere: lavender, geranium
  • Chyrus: fragrance blends with citrus, wood and floral notes
  • Smoky/spicy: tobacco, incense, ginger, cardamom, cinnamon bark

Another way of classifying fragrances is by distinguishing between different essential oils according to how long their scent lasts. A distinction is made here between top/head, middle/heart, and base notes.

  • Head notes are first ones noticed after application, but they also vanish quite quickly. They introduce the fragrance and create the framework for the actual fragrance body. These include fresh, light, sparkling scents such as citrus or light floral scents.
  • Heart notes stick and linger longer. They are the character of the perfume and take up most of the space of the perfume blend. They include rose, rose geranium, lavender, camomile, ylang ylang, jasmine, neroli, palmarosa.
  • Base notes form the perfume’s foundation. They strengthen the heart note and give it substance. For the base note, warm and heavier scents are used like essential oils from woods, resins and roots, such as sandalwood, cedarwood, ambergris, frankincense, myrrh, iris, vetiver.

The different fragrances now have to be put into the right mixing ratio. So far the 30-50-20 rule has proven to be successful. The top note makes up 30% of the mixture, the heart note corresponds to 50%, and the base note 20%. The mixture is mixed in alcohol or a carrier oil.

Depending on how high the fragrance proportion in the mixture is, we speak of:

  • Perfume: 20 percent pure fragrance
  • Eau de Parfum: 12.5 percent fragrance
  • Eau de Toilet: under 12 percent

Used Raw materials

Selbstgemachtes Parfum
Ingredients
20 ml ethanol or carrier oil
12 drops essential oil for the top note
20 drops essential oil for the heart note
8 drops essential oil for the base note

Variant 1: fresh and flowery like Chloé 2007

Top note: 8 drops of freesia, 4 drops of peony
Heart note: 14 drops of magnolia, 6 drops of rose
Base note: 4 drops of amber, 4 drops of cedar

Variant 1: flowery-powdery like Chanel N°5

Top note: 6 drops of bergamot, 6 drops of petitgrain
Heart note: 14 drops of ylang ylang, 6 drops of jasmine
Base note: 24 drops of amber, 4 drops of sandalwood

Application and shelf life

Selbstgemachtes Parfum
  • Scent molecules fly upwards, so the perfume should be sprayed upwards at a distance of about 20 to 30 cm.
  • Apply the perfume where the blood pulses (inside of the wrists, inside of the arms, temples, décolleté). The warmth of these areas helps the fragrance to unfold.
  • It is best to use a moisturizing cream under the perfume. This will ensure that the fragrance stays on the skin better. The perfume can last for several years.
Selbstgemachtes Parfum

DYI Perfume

Ingredients for approx. 22 ml
  • 20 ml ethanol or carrier oil
  • 40 drops essential oil
Equipment
  • perfume bottle
  • small funnel for filling
Instructions
  1. Fill all essential oils in a bottle.
  2. Then fill up with ethanol or carrier oil like jojoba oil.
  3. It is best to let it steep for 2 weeks. During this time, the fragrances dissolve in the alcohol and combine with each other. Regular shaking supports this process.

Liability: All stated effects are for information purposes only and do not replace a visit to the doctor. There is no guarantee for stated effects and skin compatibility of the raw materials and the end product. The production and application is at your own risk and responsibility.

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